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  • Direct current/bypass mode

    Hi

    A lot of vapers don't understand how their direct current/bypass kits work in terms of power output and vapour production so I decided to do a small, simplified write up to explain it all.

    Kits such as the TW AIO, Resolve 2 and Odyssey 18650 are all essentially direct current/bypass kits. These kits work by delivering the battery's voltage, the voltage cannot be increased or decreased by the vaper when using these kinds of kits.

    The batteries in these kits deliver a nominal voltage of 3.7 volts, this means the battery will spend the majority of its runtime delivering approximately 3.7 volts. The higher the voltage in the battery, the more power/vapour the kit will produce, as we vape we slowly discharge the battery and the amount of voltage the battery delivers will decrease. The voltage will revert back to 3.7 volts when the kit or battery is recharged.

    Now, here's where it all ties together. As an example, if you are using a direct current kit such as the TW AIO, the TW AIO does not allow you to directly increase either the wattage or voltage, so if you need more power or increased vapour production what can you do? You can fit an atomizer head with a lower resistance to increase the power produced by the AIO.

    The following formulas demonstrate how you can calculate how much power is produced by your direct current kit.

    3.7 (voltage) * 3.7 (voltage) / atomizer resistance = power produced
    Example of an AIO fitted with a 0.5ohm BF atomizer head: 3.7*3.7 / 0.5 = 27 watts
    Example of an AIO fitted with a 1.5ohm BF atomizer head: 3.7 x 3.7 ÷ 1.5 = 9 watts

    The only variable that we need to change when using the above formula is the atomizer resistance, the 3.7 x 3.7 part of the formula will always stay the same.
    If using a 1.2ohm atomizer head you'd do 3.7 x 3.7 ÷ 1.2 = 11 watts.
    If using a 2.5ohm atomizer head you'd do 3.7 x 3.7 ÷ 2.5 = 5.4 watts.


    As shown in the examples above you can see by fitting an atomizer head with a LOWER resistance you will increase both vapour production and the amount of power produced, if you fit an atomizer head with a HIGHER resistance you will decrease both vapour production and the amount of power produced.

    The more wattage a kit generates, the more vapour it will produce. Increasing wattage will decrease battery life however and the kit will require more frequent charging!

    With this knowledge you can ensure you purchase the correct atomizer head resistance to suit your preferred power output, if you want lots of power and huge clouds you'd purchase lower resistant atomizer heads, if you want less power and vapour production you'd purchase higher resistance atomizer heads.

    I'll create a series of posts continuing this subject covering battery life, amperage draw and other topics.
    Last edited by stu; 07-18-2017, 11:06 AM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by stu View Post
    Hi

    A lot of vapers don't understand how their direct current/bypass kits work in terms of power output and vapour production so I decided to do a small, simplified write up to explain it all.

    Kits such as the TW AIO, Resolve 2 and Odyssey 18650 are all essentially direct current/bypass kits. These kits work by delivering the battery's voltage, this voltage cannot be increased or decreased by the vaper,

    The batteries in these kits deliver a nominal voltage output of 3.7 volts, this means the battery will spend the majority of its runtime delivering approximately 3.7 volts. The higher the voltage in the battery, the more power/vapour the kit will produce, as we vape we discharge the battery and the voltage decreases. The voltage will revert back to 3.7 - 4.2 volts when the kit or battery is recharged.

    Now, here's where it all ties together. As an example, if you are using a direct current kit such as the TW AIO, the TW AIO does not allow you to directly increase either the wattage or voltage, so if you need more power or increased vapour production what can you do? You can fit an atomizer head with a lower resistance to increase the power produced by the AIO.

    The following formulas demonstrate how you can calculate how much power is produced by your direct current kit.

    3.7 (voltage) * 3.7 (voltage) / atomizer resistance = power produced
    Example of an AIO fitted with a 0.5ohm BF atomizer head: 3.7*3.7 / 0.5 = 27 watts
    Example of an AIO fitted with a 1.5ohm BF atomizer head: 3.7 ÷ 3.7 / 1.5 = 9 watts

    As shown in the examples above you can see by fitting an atomizer head with a LOWER resistance you will increase both vapour production and the amount of power produced, if you fit an atomizer head with a HIGHER resistance you will decrease both vapour production and the amount of power produced.

    The more wattage a kit generates, the more vapour it will produce. Increasing wattage will decrease battery life however and the kit will require more frequent charging!

    With this knowledge you can ensure you purchase the correct atomizer heads to suit your preferred power output.

    I'll create a series of posts continuing this subject covering battery life, amperage draw and other topics.
    This is really helpful Stu, I have bookmarked this for future use

    Im looking forward to your other posts.

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    • #3
      For a newbie like me this is really useful - thank you I'm slowly learning more and more which is fab!

      Em

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